static1static2static3static4

ft   y

New Water Policy and Practice Journal Information

NWPP LOGO jpeg 
 
Aims and Scope of NWPP
 
As pressure on the world´s water resources has increased, it has translated into new and increasingly interconnected challenges. There has been a shift from seeking solutions within individual scientific disciplines to seeking solutions in the interstitial spaces between scientific disciplines. There has also been a shift towards globalisation of both problems and solutions. Recognition of this globalisation of water problems has triggered awareness of the opportunity to draw ideas and possible solutions from a world of practical experiences in both similar and different contexts. A 2010 Capacity Building Workshop on Water Education in Paris identified the need to enable communication between specialists addressing specific problems and other experts and practitioners, providing new skills and knowledge competences – building a new 'water practitioner' profile. Since then, water education organisations, including UNESCO-IHE and the International Water Centre, and programs such as the UNESCO Hydrology for the Environment, Life and Policy (HELP) have sought to increase water management capacity and to facilitate the integration of education, policy and practice.

New Water Policy and Practice is a unique, peer-reviewed English language journal devoted to creating a platform for the world's emerging water leaders and thinkers. The journal is dedicated to encouraging and disseminating new thinking about water policy and practice, about the education that supports it, and about the interrelationships between them.

Sponsored by the Policy Studies Organization, New Water Policy and Practice will be published twice per year, commencing in 2014. Additional special issues will be published on an ad-hoc basis. Some editions will be focussed on thematic issues (eg urban water conflicts, water pricing policy), some on key events (eg international water forums and conferences, launch of new policy initiatives), some on specific exemplary management challenges and solutions (eg management of a particular river system) and others on emergent scientific disciplinary or education discussions (eg ecohydrology, new learning methodologies). All editions will feature foundational contributions from internationally recognised water leaders, together with submissions expressing new ideas from the world's young water professionals and emerging water leaders.

Contributions are in a broad range of formats, such as research papers, review papers, narratives of experiences and case studies, opinion pieces and interviews. Written material, audio recordings and film clips are all encouraged. New Water Policy and Practice will provide information and announcements relevant to the journal aims, including international conferences, web-links, reports and a calendar of events. Additionally, the Journal will help to identify particularly relevant opportunities for research funding linked to specific issue themes.

 
Content of NWPP
 
Work relevant to this journal is being conducted in all countries at local, national, regional and global scales. Research and education centres, public sector water management bodies, community groups, NGOs and private enterprise should all be involved in water policy, practice and education. Contributions for this journal will be encouraged from all of these types of organisations, enhanced by the global spread of the Editorial Board. Particular emphasis will be placed on sourcing contributions from young water professional groups and institutes providing international water education courses.

Contributions are in a broad range of formats, such as research papers, review papers, narratives of experiences and case studies, opinion pieces and interviews. Written material, audio recordings and film clips are all encouraged.

New Water Policy and Practice will seek and provide information and announcements relevant to the journal aims, including international conferences, web-links, reports and a calendar of events. Additionally, the Journal will help to identify particularly relevant opportunities for research funding linked to specific issue themes.

This journal will link directly with water education courses being delivered by the Editors-in-Chief and other members of the Editorial Board in Europe, Australia and elsewhere, including the Erasmus Mundus Master of Ecohydrology and the International Water Centre MSc in Integrated Water Management.

 
Background
 
The growing global water challenges are well documented. Increasing pressure on the world´s water resources has translated into new and more interconnected challenges. In response, water management has also changed over time with the introduction of new disciplines, new techniques, new language and new thinking. Ecology, economics and other social sciences have all progressively added to the historic hydrology and engineering base. More recently, sociology, anthropology and social psychology have also become part of solution to the challenges of water management. This has required re-thinking of some of the previously integrated terms and encouraged a more rigorous definition of the concepts used by different specialists (Camkin and Neto, 2012).

There has been a shift from seeking solutions within individual scientific disciplines to multidisciplinarity, interdisciplinary solutions and, more recently and increasingly, to transdisciplinary thinking and approaches – to seeking solutions in the interstitial spaces between scientific disciplines. There has also been a shift towards globalisation of both problems and solutions. As problems become increasingly connected, they are also increasingly globalised. Recognition of this globalisation of water problems has triggered awareness of the opportunity to draw ideas and possible solutions from a world of practical experiences in both similar and different contexts. "Researchers, funders, and research end-users are increasingly appreciating that new research skills must be developed if human societies are to be more effective in tackling the complex problems that confront us and in sustaining the sort of world we wish to live in" (Bammer 2005).

Five regional meetings promoted by UNESCO in 2009 (North-America, Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa) addressed the growing need for transdisciplinary approaches, holistic vision, incorporation of non-formal knowledge and views, effective participation and bottom-up action for identification of problems and solutions in water education. There is, however, a general context of tension and competition between specialisations within different disciplines, and without specialisation it is difficult to obtain formal and academic recognition, either at Undergraduate, Master or PhD level. The 2010 Capacity Building Workshop on Water Education in Paris identified the need to build tertiary or vocational level which includes participants with different backgrounds in order to facilitate cooperation and exchange of views. The integrated approach should enable communication between specialists addressing specific problems and other experts and practitioners, providing new skills and knowledge competences – a new 'water practitioner' profile.

Since then, water education organisations, including UNESCO-IHE and the International Water Centre, and programs such as the UNESCO Hydrology for the Environment, Life and Policy (HELP) have sought to increase water management capacity and to facilitate the integration of education, policy and practice. A remaining key question is whether any ongoing tension between the need for transdisciplinary thinking and the disciplinary focus of traditional science, and the inclusion of non-scientific knowledge, is being sufficiently addressed to create the freedom and flexibility needed to tackle the increasingly interrelated and complex water challenges the world is facing.

To address the increasingly complex water challenges the world is facing, we need transversal approaches to develop new and innovative methods that link theory and practice, management and policy.